Building Strong Math Foundation

Building Strong Math Foundation


Five year old Sara is playing with three dolls that came from a set of four.

Passing by, her teacher inquires, “Where is the other doll?”Her teacher overheard Sara saying, “[Pointing to each doll] I’m calling you ‘one.’ You’re ‘two’ and ‘three’. Where is your sister, ‘four’?”

She got engaged with dolls for another minute. “Oh! Here you are ‘Four’.”

Sara, a small girl, incorporated counting to keep track of her dolls. She has unknowingly learnt the basics of counting. Children’s play happens to be their foremost source of ‘pre-mathematical’ experience.


Children start developing math concepts at a very initial stage; which help them in spontaneous recognition and identification of numbers. They usually get into schools with varied levels of math capabilities and understanding. Some are able to understand the crux of concepts without much effort but there are a few who need additional support.

There are some children who would get too much confused and perplexed with math, they seem to be lost completely. That’s a simple case of weak math basics. Without a solid math foundation children will probably get troubled every now and then.

Over the period of time children develop an attitude towards math. These beliefs influence their thinking towards math which is reflected in later years. The “don’t know or don’t understand” factor in a child can develop math anxiety and could make math scarier. A not so strong math foundation may become increasingly difficult and confusing for children, which eventually would end up in poor grades.

Therefore, there has to be a systematic approach to meet the requirements of understanding the concepts, like,

Developing plan of action – A specific and clear action plan is more likely to succeed. Making children understand the process and techniques will encourage them and once they understand the concept they will be able to raise their difficulty level for any given topic.

Measurable goals – Measurable goals are critically essential so that children can have multiple goals on the way to achieving the big goal.

Student preferred learning style – Each child has different capabilities and has a unique way to understand. Teachers use multi-sensory approach because they deal with many students at one point of time. It includes many techniques like,

  • Colorful illustrations
  • Verbal description
  • Study material
  • Group activities
  • Animations and flash programs

Liberty for exploration – Math is a continuous process of exploration which deals with techniques and skills that result in correct or incorrect answer. Teachers can help children in developing this attitude.

Celebrating on small success – Pat your back when you understand how the concept works for those you had memorized earlier. Feel good when you feel less anxious next time you open your math book. The idea is to build up your confidence that, “You can do Math”.

Math Buddy has been created to build strong math foundation for children. Our curriculum and activities are exclusively designed to provide complete assistance for deep understanding of concepts. Click here to learn more about Math Buddy.